David Bedrick, JD, Dipl. PW is an author, speaker, teacher and expert on the topics of shame, night time dreams, weight loss and body image, diversity and social injustice, and new paradigms in psychology.


Shame

We have learned to view aspects of ourselves that disturb us as inadequacies or pathologies we must correct. This viewpoint has its roots in allopathic medicine, which regards difficulties as symptoms of illness, and feelings and behaviors outside the norm as problems we need to suppress or eliminate.
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Night Time Dreams

Albert Einstein said, “We cannot solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them.” Our dreams are absolutely brilliant at doing just that —flipping our usual script and offering a radical new orientation designed just for us. They reveal the fear behind our rigidity; the beauty behind what we hold as ugly and the ugliness behind what we hold as beautiful; and the power behind what we deem vulnerable.
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Weight Loss, Body Image & Sexism

To talk about weight loss without talking about sexism and the struggles specific to women and girls in our culture is just wrong. To not talk about how much self-hatred people have about their bodies is just wrong. To not address the powerful reasons why people eat is just wrong. To not talk about the possibility of failure to lose weight in a sustainable way sets dieters up to feel even worse.
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Diversity and Social Injustice

Yes, racism’s ugly impact can be seen in America’s organizations, prisons, streets, and homes. And yes, homophobia causes a staggering number of LGBT teens to end their lives in despair. How, then, shall we bear witness to these realities? How does denying and dismissing these problems enrage and shame those oppressed by them? How does privilege promote blindness to injustice?
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Beyond Popular Psychology

When did psychology become bumper stickers promoting the market values of mainstream success, teaching us only to be more functional, smiling, pleasing, cooperative, and forgiving? A psychology that fears the darkness and fights to keep us in the light is an impotent psychology—one that lacks the power to address society’s biggest problems.
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